Tennis Elbow Anyone?

 

Have you ever seen a person wearing a tensor bandage or support around their elbow? It is very likely that they are suffering from “tennis elbow.” The medical terms for tennis elbow are “lateral epicondylitis, lateral epicondylosis or lateral epicondylopathy.” It is a condition that causes pain, tenderness and inflammation on the outer part of the elbow.

Tennis elbow is caused by repetitive activities such as tennis, hammering or using garden shears. Repetitive overuse causes inflammation of the muscles & tendons attached to the outer part of the elbow.

Health professionals can make a diagnosis of “tennis elbow” after taking a detailed history and from performing a thorough physical examination. Tennis elbow cannot be diagnosed from blood tests or X-rays.

A common medical treatment for tennis elbow is to modify the activity that is causing the pain. For example tennis players can change the grip size of their racquet and carpenters can use different size screwdrivers or hammers.

Other standard medical treatment for tennis elbow includes ice, stretching, elbow braces, OTC medications such as ASA or ibuprofen, cortisone shots and in rare cases surgery.

There is an exciting new treatment for tennis elbow called the Graston Technique® (G.T.)

G.T. is instrument-assisted soft tissue mobilization that utilizes stainless steel instruments to detect “scar tissue” When skillfully utilized by a trained practitioner; these instruments help breaks down “scar tissue” and fascial restrictions.

G.T is a new and innovative way to decrease pain and improve function. It is highly effective in treating tennis elbow and several other conditions.

The Graston Technique® was conceived by an athlete who suffered a debilitating knee injury while water skiing. After conventional therapy failed, he applied his professional background in machining to create the initial Graston Technique® instruments.

The concept of cross fiber massage is not new. Graston Technique® is grounded in the works of Dr. James Cyriax, a British orthopedic surgeon. The use of specially designed instruments and protocol has been a recognized part of the manual therapy industry for more than 20 years.

Graston Technique® has become standard protocol in many universities and hospital-based outpatient facilities as well as industrial on-site treatment settings.

Graston Technique® was 1st researched at Ball Memorial Hospital and Ball State University in Indiana. It is engaged in research projects at Indiana University, Texas Back Institute, New York Chiropractic College and St. Vincent Hospital in Indianapolis. Graston Technique® has become part of the curriculum at 21 respected universities and colleges. It is included in doctoral physical therapy programs, athletic training programs and doctor of chiropractic programs. Today, there are nearly 5000 clinicians who use the Graston Technique® protocol. The technique is also being used within the professional sports industry by the NBA, NHL, NFL, and Major League Baseball trainers.

Do you know anybody who might benefit from the Graston technique?
Let us know!

There Is A Hole In My Sidewalk

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There Is a Hole in My Sidewalk
Autobiography in Five Short Chapters
By Portia Nelson

Chapter One
I walk down the street.
There is a deep hole in the sidewalk.
I fall in.
I am lost…I am helpless.
It isn’t my fault.
It takes forever to find a way out.

Chapter Two
I walk down the street.
There is a deep hole in the sidewalk.
I pretend that I don’t see it.
I fall in again.
I can’t believe I am in this same place.
But, it isn’t my fault.
It still takes a long time to get out.

Chapter Three
I walk down the same street.
There is a deep hole in the sidewalk.
I see it is there.
I still fall in…it’s a habit…but,
My eyes are open
I know where I am
It is my fault.
I get out immediately,

Chapter Four
I walk down the same street.
There is a deep hole in the sidewalk.
I walk around it.

Chapter Five
I walk down another street.

WHY I AM A DOCTOR OF CHIROPRACTIC

Why I am

Why I am a Doctor of Chiropractic:
Because I honor the inborn potential of everyone to be truly healthy.
Because I desire to help the newborn, the aged, and those without hope.
Because I choose to care for the patient with the dis-ease, not the disease.
Because I wish to assist rather than intrude; to free rather than control.
Because I seek to correct the cause, not its effect.
Because I know doctors do not heal, only the body can heal itself.
Because I have been called to serve others.
Because I want to make a difference.
Because everyday I get to witness miracles……….
Because I know it is right!

Wilma Rudolph: An Inspirational Story:

AN INSPIRATIONAL STORY

“My doctors told me I would never walk again. My mother told me I would. I believed my mother.”
Wilma Rudolph

When Wilma Rudolph was four years old, she had a disease called polio which causes people to be crippled and often unable to walk. To make matters worse, her family was poor and could not afford good medical care. She was from a large family – she was the 20th of 22 children! Her father was a railroad porter and her mother was a maid.

Her mother decided she would do everything she could to help Wilma walk again.

The doctors had said that she would not be able to walk… but every week she took her daughter on a long bus trip to a hospital to receive therapy. It didn’t help, but the doctors said she should massage Wilma’s legs every day. She taught the brothers and sisters how to do it, and they also rubbed their sister’s legs four times a day.

By the time she was eight, she could walk with a leg brace. After that, she used a high-topped shoe to support her foot. She played basketball with her brothers every day.

Three years later, her mother came home one day to find Wilma playing basketball by herself — barefooted. She didn’t even have to use the special shoe.

A track coach encouraged her to start running. She ran so well that during her senior year in high school, she qualified for the 1956 Olympics in Melbourne, Australia. She won a bronze medal in the women’s 400 meter relay.

In 1959, she qualified for the 1960 Olympic Games in Rome by setting a world’s record in the 200 meter race. At the Olympics that year, she won two gold medals; one for the 100 meter race and one for the 200 meter race.

Then she sprained her ankle, but she ignored the pain and helped her team to win another gold medal for the 400 meter relay! She retired from running when she was 22 years old, but she went on to coach women’s track teams and encourage young people.

Wilma thought that God had a greater purpose for her than to win three gold medals. She started the Wilma Rudolph Foundation to help children learn about discipline and hard work.

She died of brain cancer in 1994. Even though she is no longer alive, her influence still lives on in the lives of many young people who look up to her.

 

What is pain? Why does it hurt so much?

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I am often asked by patients: How can I be getting better when I still have pain? Pain is a sign that the body is healing. It is normal to feel pain while you are recovering. Did you ever wonder why things sometimes hurt more before they get better? Why do we have to feel it to heal it? Why “No Pain, No Gain”? We have all been brainwashed from day-one by the pharmaceutical companies to believe that pain in any shape or form is unacceptable.

Do you remember these television commercials?

 

  • “How do YOU spell relief?”
  • “Plop, plop. Fizz, fizz. Oh what a relief it is!”
  • “PAIN! HEADACHE! PAIN! HEADACHE!”

    Then you are given the easy solution. By taking this pill or potion your pain will be taken away instantly and you will live happily ever after.

    Aside: Along with, “Your cheque is in the mail,” another one of the biggest lies in history would have to be; “These new pills have no major side effects.” Remember the famous line from movie producer Michael Moore, “Give a lie a 24-hour head start and the truth will never catch up with it.”

    What Is Pain?
    According to chiropractor, Dr. Barry Weinberg, pain is nothing more than the experience of separation. If you cut your finger with a knife, the separation of the skin causes pain. If you break a bone, the separation of the bone tissue causes pain. If you break up a relationship or a loved one dies, the separation from that person causes emotional pain. All pain is separation.

    If the separation continues and becomes great enough, the pain begins to diminish until it is no longer felt. In these circumstances we may feel as if the injury or trauma is “healing” because the pain is going away. In fact, the pain is diminishing because the separation is becoming so great that it grows beyond our level of awareness. Rather than healing (becoming whole) we are merely becoming numb.

    We may think, “I’m better! The pain is gone!” Only to find a few weeks, months, or years later, that we re-experience the same pain…only stronger. We take a few aspirin or go for a cortisone injection…enhancing our separation. Once again, the pain is gone…for a while. It is like the gas light in the car. Have you ever been driving when suddenly the gas light comes on? You keep driving and the gas light goes off. A few minutes later it comes on a little longer…and again it turns off. Even quicker, the light comes on again — and stays on. If you don’t get gas now, you’ll probably come to a sudden halt. Our bodies, and our pain, function in a similar way. Eventually, if we don’t listen to the signal, all will come to a stop.

    When we understand that pain is not the problem, but the signal of a problem, we are more equipped and more responsible to take action and find a solution to the problem rather than just attacking the signal through a pain reliever, muscle relaxant, anti-depressant or anti-inflammatory drug. If the fire alarm went off in your house, would you not be annoyed if the fire department came and merely removed the alarm? What about the fire?

    So why do things begin to hurt more when you begin to heal?

    There are two reasons. One, as you heal, or become more whole, you become more aware of your body and yourself. With this increased awareness, the pain signals are experienced more. It is not that the pain is getting “worse”… you are feeling more. Healing is not about feeling better; it is about being better able to feel.

    The more aware we are of the subtle signals of our bodies, minds and spirits, the more able we are to adapt to the changes in our environment. Would you rather hear the lion’s roar miles away…or feel its breath on your neck? When we are more aware of the subtle, we have more room to make decisions. Our bodies give us such signals, but often they are ignored. Over time, the body must get our attention or more severe circumstances will ensue.

    We begin to experience pain…if we don’t listen to this more advanced signal, the pain will increase to a point, but then suddenly stop. We have become numb. This part of us will surely die, unless immediate and critical action is taken. As the part, which has become so separate that it is unfelt, begins to become more whole with the body, the pain will return. Often it will be very intense, but as the healing continues it reduces and we begin to enjoy a finer quality of life. In order to heal, that part must be felt. We must be aware of it.

    When Dr. Barry first began Chiropractic College, he met a woman who was paralyzed from the waist down, with no feeling or movement in the legs. She told him that a heavy box fell on her when she was five years old, and she had been crippled ever since. Four years later, he ran into her again…literally. She was walking. He was astounded and asked what had happened. She explained that she was under intensive treatment and that over the course of four years; she got her legs back. He asked her what that was like. She said that it was the most painful experience of her life. First her legs began to tingle for about three months…then they began to throb for about six months…for almost ten months after that, she felt constant excruciating pain. Finally, the pain began to subside and she was able to feel her legs pleasantly and walk. He asked her if it was worth all that to get her legs back. She said she would have experienced it twice over to get her legs back.

    What are you willing to feel in order to heal?

    In closing, I would like to share a technique I learned from Dr. Barry that I use with my clients when they are feeling pain. Rather than trying to make the pain go away (through drugs, therapies or any other means), I recommend feeling it completely. Not just the pain, but the part that is hurting. Sit in a chair or lie down, take nice deep breaths, and just allow yourself to feel the hurt part. Just be aware of it…no judgment…no complaints…no worries…just be aware. As you stay aware of it, realize that the pain is not you. The pain is a signal from you to you alerting you that something is separate. As you stay aware, the pain will become more separate from your experience, but the part of you that is separate will begin to re-unite with yourself and heal.

 

Graston Technique (R) for Golf Injuries

GOLFERS CAN GET BACK IN THE SWING SOONER

WITH THE GRASTON TECHNIQUE

Two Spokane specialists, a podiatrist and a chiropractor, who form a collaborative team in the treatment of amateur golfers, have concluded that The Graston Technique is more effective than massage at reducing fascial (ligament) restrictions and tendonitis of the foot — resulting in pain relief as well as improved range-of-motion in the foot.

They were quick to point out the importance of having the Graston Technique available for golf related injuries since musculoskeletal problems sustained on the links occur at a rate of approximately 1.25 times a year per golfer.

Other injuries golfers are prone to experience can also be treated successfully without drugs or surgery using the Graston Technique include: shoulder and/or elbow tendonitis (sometimes referred to as golfer’s elbow, or tennis elbow), knee problems, Achilles’ tendonitis and others.

For more information about the Graston Technique, please call our office.